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Serious Consequences For Veterans And Their Families Between August 1953 and December 1987, the drinking water at Camp Lejeune was contaminated with industrial solvents, benzene, and other chemicals. This had serious health consequences for those stationed at the base. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs recognizes this, and provides benefits to those who were affected . . .

A Contamination At Camp Lejeune: The Basics

Serious Consequences For Veterans And Their Families

Between August 1953 and December 1987, the drinking water at Camp Lejeune was contaminated with industrial solvents, benzene, and other chemicals. This had serious health consequences for those stationed at the base. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs recognizes this, and provides benefits to those who were affected.

The Honoring Our PACT Act was introduced in 2019 to provide these benefits to more veterans. The Act would expand the definition of “Camp Lejeune veteran” to include any individual who served at the base for 30 days or more, regardless of whether they were on active duty or not. It would also provide health care benefits to family members of veterans who have died as a result of the contamination.

The water contamination at Camp Lejeune is considered one of, if not the most significant episode of water contamination in US history.

Camp Lejeune Water Contamination Health Impacts

The health impacts of the Camp Lejeune water contamination are well-documented. A number of studies have shown increased rates of cancer and other diseases among those who were exposed to the contaminated water.

The water contamination at Camp Lejeune has been linked to a variety of cancers and health issues, including: breast cancer, kidney cancer, adult onset leukemia, liver cancer, neural tube defects, Non Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Parkinson’s disease.

There may also be other less-common diseases and health conditions linked to toxic exposure from the tainted water supply at Camp Lejeune during this same timeframe, including breast cancer, esophageal cancer, female infertility, hepatic steatosis, kidney cancer, leukemia, lung cancer, miscarriage, multiple myeloma, neurobehavioral effects, renal toxicity, and scleroderma.

Because it takes so long to develop, contaminated water may not show symptoms for years. Investigations are underway to determine all the health conditions caused by exposure.

The Department of Veterans’ Affairs has recognized that exposure to the contaminated water affects not only military men and women but also their family members, contractors, and civilian employees and personnel who were similarly stationed at the military base. Studies performed by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (“ATSDR”) have created models to ascertain the full reach of the contamination.

If you served at Camp Lejeune or lived there for 30 days or more between 1953 and 1987,  you may be eligible for health benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs. These benefits can include free health care, disability compensation, and reimbursement for out-of-pocket expenses related to treatment of diseases associated with the contamination.

The Camp Lejeune water contamination is a tragedy that affected many veterans and their families. If you served at Camp Lejeune during the time of contamination, it is important to be aware of these health risks. You may eligible for health care benefits through the Department of Veterans Affairs. Furthermore, you may be eligible for significant compensation via lawsuits being brought right now on a contingent fee basis.

The Camp Lejeune Justice Act Of 2022

The Camp Lejeune Justice Act of 2022, part of the Honoring Our PACT Act, is a law that was signed by President Joe Biden in 2022. The Act allows veterans and their families who were affected by the water contamination at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina to file a lawsuit against the federal government.

The Camp Lejeune Justice Act, which revolves around the water contamination at Camp Lejeune, is part of the comprehensive Pact Act. The main objective of the Pact Act is to improve access to health care and disability benefits for veterans exposed to toxic substances around the world.

The Camp Lejeune Justice Act is an important step in ensuring that those who have been affected by the Camp Lejeune water contamination have access to justice. This law will help to hold the government accountable for the contamination that occurred at Camp Lejeune and will provide compensation for those who were affected.